Setting Up Pretty URLs in WordPress

Setting up pretty URLs is usually the first thing I do after installing a new WordPress blog. In this screencast, I will demonstrate how to turn your urls from looking like ?p=1 to /2008/2/16/post-name/. The process is pretty simple, but if file permissions aren’t set quite right, you may run into a little gotcha. This video shows how to correct this if you happen to run into that problem.

Setting Up Pretty URLs in WordPress

[Click here to download(.mov)] [Watch at Viddler (at full-screen or original size)]

Note About Pretty URLs

Pretty URLs, also known as Search Engine Friendly URLs, will help your blog’s content to be indexed better by Google and the other search engines. This is possible because the url itself describes the content of a page or post. Again, this isn’t the only factor that will affect your search engine rankings, but it will contribute to better rankings.

About My Sponsors

I am an affiliate of Hostmonster and Bluehost. I receive a commission for any account sign-ups that are referred from this site. This allows me to put in the time necessary to deliver useful content. This blog is hosted on Hostmonster. I have been a customer of both Hostmonster and Bluehost for several years now and have been very satisfied by their customer service and reliability. Hostmonster and Bluehost are the same company.

Installing WordPress on HostMonster Or Bluehost

Installing and maintaining a WordPress blog is really nice on Hostmonster and Bluehost because it uses Fantastico, a very nice application manager. In this screencast, I will walk you through the steps of setting up a new WordPress installation.

setup_wordpress.png

Click here to download

Note About WordPress

WordPress is a very nice piece of software that can be used for more than just blogs. In future screencasts, I will show how to use WordPress to create a corporate informational site. I will also show how you can actually use WordPress to sell products.

A Note About My Sponsor

Please note: I am an affiliate of Hostmonster and Bluehost. I receive a commission for any account sign-ups that are referred from this site. This allows me to put in the time necessary to deliver useful content. This blog is hosted on Hostmonster. I have been a customer of both Hostmonster and Bluehost for several years now and have been very satisfied by their customer service and reliability. Hostmonster and Bluehost are the same company.

WordPress Screencasts

I have set up several WordPress blogs for family and friends and have decided that I would create a series of screencasts showing how to accomplish several tasks created for users ranging from a beginner experience level to an advanced user.

These screencasts will be centered around a hosting provider such as Bluehost or Hostmonster or any other hosting provider that gives you access to Cpanel or Fantastico.

I plan to cover the following topics:

I will be linking to the new tutorials from this page as they are created. If there are any other topics you would like me to cover, please post a comment. I will gladly try to cover any topic of interest.

Please note: I am an affiliate of Hostmonster and Bluehost. I receive a commission for any account sign-ups that are referred from this site. This allows me to put in the time necessary to deliver useful content. This blog is hosted on Hostmonster. I have been a customer of both Hostmonster and Bluehost for several years now and have been very satisfied by their customer service and reliability. Hostmonster and Bluehost are the same company.

How to add tags to your template WordPress 2.3

Although I upgraded to WordPress 2.3 over a month ago, I hadn’t taken the time to edit my template so that it would show the tags on each of my posts. I also wanted to add a tag cloud to the sidebar. It’s actually very easy to add tags to your template with WordPress 2.3.The following two links will help you get all set up:

  • the_tags: this method is used for displaying the tags of a single post. Use this within your Single Post template file.
  • wp_tag_cloud: this method will build a tag cloud for you. Use this within your Sidebar template file.

It’s pretty simple. Just add those two methods to your single post and sidebar templates, and you’ll be ready to go.

Upgrading to WordPress 2.3.1 – Now with tagging

WordPress 2.3.1 finally came to Fantastico on my Hostmonster account, so I have finally upgraded. I haven’t seen any problems yet. I’m hoping that most bugs have been smoothed over from the 2.3 release.

One of the things that I’m most excited about for this release of WordPress is the native support for tagging. I wrote a post a little while back on category cleaning for my blog. I used to treat categories like tags, but I’ve changed my thinking and the way that I organize my blog. I now have 1 category per post (unless I really have to go to 2).

Categories are like folders in a filing cabinet, tags are more like the index of a book, describing the contents so that you can easily find them later on.

After having used del.icio.us for almost 2 years now, I’ve found tags to be a really effective way of indexing my bookmarks. I can almost always find what I’m looking for very, very quickly. I’m hoping that tagging will come in useful for my blog as well.

Digitizing Books While Fighting Spam

You may have noticed that I recently added a CAPTCHA to my blog. My blog was getting flogged by spam comments that were making it past my Akismet Spam filter. I decided to install the reCAPTCHA wordpress plugin.

Why reCAPTCHA?

ReCAPTCHA is a system developed at Carnegie Mellon University that uses CAPTCHAs to digitize scanned books! The plugin will give you 2 words to verify that you are a human and can in fact identify the words correctly.

How does it work?

reCAPTCHA improves the process of digitizing books by sending words that cannot be read by computers to the Web in the form of CAPTCHAs for humans to decipher. More specifically, each word that cannot be read correctly by OCR is placed on an image and used as a CAPTCHA. This is possible because most OCR programs alert you when a word cannot be read correctly.

But if a computer can’t read such a CAPTCHA, how does the system know the correct answer to the puzzle? Here’s how: Each new word that cannot be read correctly by OCR is given to a user in conjunction with another word for which the answer is already known. The user is then asked to read both words. If they solve the one for which the answer is known, the system assumes their answer is correct for the new one. The system then gives the new image to a number of other people to determine, with higher confidence, whether the original answer was correct.

Source: http://recaptcha.net/learnmore.htmlÂ

I believe this is innovation at its finest. The guys and gals over there at Carnegie Mellon should really be commended for this effort.

If you post a comment, you can feel good about contributing to a greater good.